In Part One, I wrote of how “privilege” is the result of actions.  If a recognizable group tends to make Good Choices (work hard, don’t break the law, etc.), then members of that group achieve some “privilege” accordingly.  When Blacks are committing crimes at ten times the rate Whites are, then Blacks are looked on with greater suspicion.  This is only natural.

(This is why I advocate a truly blind justice system.  The jury should not see the defendant, and he should always be “John Doe” to the jury.  Even if the jurors do not see the defendant, they will be more favorably disposed to Mike Jankowski than to LaShawn White.)

But now, I want to turn to education.  Specifically, the education of women.

Individually, this is a fabulous thing.  I certainly want my daughters to be educated, and to get professional degrees.  I would love for all of my daughters to get their doctoral degrees before they marry.  I want them to marry other professionals, and to raise their children the same way.

But what does that do in the aggregate?

Back in the days when few women went to college, college-educated men were more likely to marry women who were not college educated.  Now, we have a fairly clear split.  College-educated men marry college-educated women, and non-college-educated men marry non-college-educated women.

Well, it does tend to be the more intelligent people who are college-educated.  So more-intelligent men are marrying more-intelligent women, and less-intelligent men are marrying less-intelligent women.

Furthermore, more-educated women tend to have fewer children, and to have them later in life.

So let’s look at some made-up, but hopefully reasonable numbers.  (“Fake, but accurate”?)  In a century, an educated couple who has two children at an average age of 33, will have three generations of offspring: 2^3=8.  Eight intelligent great-grandchildren.  But of course, those great-grandchildren also have other, presumably similarly-intelligent great-grandparents, and we are just making replacements, not increasing the population of intelligent people.

Meanwhile, the less-intelligent couple will have four children at an average age of 25.  Four generations in a century: 4^4=256 less-intelligent great-great-grandchildren.  They, too, will have other great-great-grandparents, of course, but they have doubled the number of less-intelligent people every generation.  So for every pair of less-intelligent great-great-grandparents, there are thirty-two (32) less intelligent great-great-grandchildren.

With intelligence and education’s being prime indicators of income and wealth, we now see a significant driver of increasing income inequality.