novatownhall blog

Where you are held accountable for your convictions and record

Rats are overtaking St. Clair shores. A proposal by the council is to put a $5 bounty per rat. Good money making endeavor. I’m sure there will be many ingenious ways (and some illegal) in bagging the poor little critters. But the better idea is in the comments (3rd one down from last check). Between the bounty on rats or liberals, citizens could make much more money on liberals. Why you ask? Because rats are smart enough to be quiet and hide. Looks like a win-win for St. Clair and Michigan.

Who would have believed that after all the voting, no Nationals were selected. Jordan Zimmermann got the nod from the NL board but pulled up lame just days before the All Star game. So what happened next? They picked a Marlin which gave the NL East leaders NO representation. Oh, but hark! A Braves pitcher can’t play because of lacking rest from his last outing so the benevolent MLB picked Tyler Clipperd to take his place.

I see stats for our players that can’t be beat. I see at least 3 All Stars on this current Nats team. My favorite (since he first came up) has been Anthony Rendon, especially his performance this year, and for good reason. I love baseball. I LOVE BASEBALL! And it has shown politics for some time now. This is getting out of hand and politics seems to be ruining every facet of daily life. I like Clippard a lot (Mama doesn’t) but I can watch him during regular games. I have decided to let this All Star game go and stick with the regular season Nats games. And when we win the pennant, we can do it without the help of MLB. Then next year the MLB will be scrambling to get Nat players for the All Star game. Shame they can’t see the light shinning in their eyes now.

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Yes, the left is going bonkers for Ginsberg’s “blistering” dissent from the Supreme Court majority’s ruling in Burwell v Hobby Lobby.

Let’s take those “8 Best Lines” seriatim:

Ginsburg wrote that her five male colleagues, “in a decision of startling breadth,” would allow corporations to opt out of almost any law that they find “incompatible with their sincerely held religious beliefs.”

The first thing to note is that Dana Liebelson does not consider Justice Breyer male. Interesting. Maybe she knows something we don’t.

But be that as it may, if such laws are incompatible with sincerely held religious beliefs, then they are clearly in violation of the First Amendment unless they protect the rights of others, and should be overturned by the Court. But then, the requirement from which Hobby Lobby and Conestoga won relief is NOT A LAW. It is merely a REGULATION written by a nameless bureaucrat. Also, the regulation does not protect anyone’s rights — the employees of these companies can still obtain the abortifacients they desire.

The exemption sought by Hobby Lobby and Conestoga would…deny legions of women who do not hold their employers’ beliefs access to contraceptive coverage.

Those women obviously have jobs, or this would not be an issue. Therefore, they can pay for them themselves.

Religious organizations exist to foster the interests of persons subscribing to the same religious faith. Not so of for-profit corporations. Workers who sustain the operations of those corporations commonly are not drawn from one religious community.

Irrelevant — they can go work for someone else if they do not like their employer’s benefits package.

Any decision to use contraceptives made by a woman covered under Hobby Lobby’s or Conestoga’s plan will not be propelled by the Government, it will be the woman’s autonomous choice, informed by the physician she consults.

In which case, it should be her autonomous PAYMENT, too. If you want to choose the tune, you can choose to pay the piper.

It bears note in this regard that the cost of an IUD is nearly equivalent to a month’s full-time pay for workers earning the minimum wage.

No, it really doesn’t “bear note”. If one cannot afford an IUD, one can choose to use other forms of birth control. Or, choose not to have vaginal sex.

Would the exemption…extend to employers with religiously grounded objections to blood transfusions (Jehovah’s Witnesses); antidepressants (Scientologists); medications derived from pigs, including anesthesia, intravenous fluids, and pills coated with gelatin (certain Muslims, Jews, and Hindus); and vaccinations[?]…Not much help there for the lower courts bound by today’s decision.

Sure. Why not? Again — if you don’t like it, get another job.

Approving some religious claims while deeming others unworthy of accommodation could be ‘perceived as favoring one religion over another,’ the very ‘risk the [Constitution's] Establishment Clause was designed to preclude.

Well, that’s easy — just approve them all. Duh.

The court, I fear, has ventured into a minefield.

No — it is the legislature (in passing the law in the first place) that planted the mines, and the executive branch (in writing such heinous regulations) that is going for a stroll therein. They deserve to have it blow up in their faces.

Forbes calls it a “surprisingly strong jobs report”. Yahoo says, “The government reported surprisingly robust job gains in June.” And the Wall Street Journal gushed, “U.S. employers added jobs at a robust clip in June and the unemployment rate fell, signs of labor-market strength as the economic recovery heads into its sixth year.”

Let’s look at the June report itself, shall we?

On the surface, it looks pretty good — according to the Household Survey, 407,000 more people were employed in June than in May.  What’s not to like?

I suspect you know where this is going — it’s going further down the page, to the part-time numbers.

There were 1,115,000 more people working part-time in June than in May.  With just a little math, we see that that means there were 708,000 FEWER people working full-time in June than in May.

That’s not job creation, it’s division of labor.

Sorry about the delay, Supervisor. I wanted to get this posted when it came out but the ADHD sent me to other realms. Here is the story in the WaPo I personally want to thank those 686 petitioners that put us on another wild goose chase, wasting hard earned tax dollars that could have been much better served. Wasted money, end result the same as the first time, and much more egg on your faces. Like all liberals, you whine about things that are against your agenda and then you whine some more when you don’t get your way. I’m sure you will have plenty to complain about. Sour grapes from prunes is what I see. I guess the next exercise is to lie some more during next election and, possibly, get someone out of state to run for Sterling supervisor. Oh. You already tried that, didn’t you? The new losers are the same as the old losers, just recycled. I don’t need to name names. And, yes, this is what is known as justice!

I was reading up on new military enlist criteria and, specifically, criteria about tattoos. I am glad to see that criteria is changing and becoming much more selective for appearance, brains, clean background and the like. Being as how the military is being downsized, they are able to tailor our military forces to a higher caliber group. But I ran across something that just stymied me; that of Atheist chaplains and how they are not allowed in the military chaplain corps.

As the article states, 98% of chaplains are of Christian faith. That would make sense since it appears to be the majority faith in the military. And, yes, you apparently have a small atheist contingent in the military. What I can’t figure out is why they would need a chaplain? What purpose could they possibly have in calming personnel going in to battle or delivering a hopeful and saving message to those wounded and dying? I looked up an article to see just what atheists believe. This is one of the articles I found. This is all well and good but how does an atheist chaplain work or fit in? I really don’t get it.